Dental students' characteristics, not debt, influence job choices

Dental students' characteristics, not debt, influence job choices
Article Thumbnail Image May 21, 2014 — Dental students' characteristics, rather than educational debt, have a greater influence on their employment choices, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Despite concerns …
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Red Wine Fights Cavities Too?
The American Dental Association suggests that the best ways to fight plaque and tartar buildup is to regularly floss, rush with a fluoride toothpaste, and even using antimocrobial rinses. However, the ACS points out in a recent press release that these …
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Dr. Jeff Hersh: Diabetes explained
More than 55 million Americans have pre-diabetes, although this does not necessarily lead to diabetes; the Diabetes Prevention Program showed that with certain lifestyle changes, including modest weight loss, increased physical activity and behavior …
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North Park Family Dentistry Offering New Alternative For Missing Teeth
He organizes charitable community clinics to serve the smiles of Columbus residents in need. He is a member of the American Dental Association, the Georgia Dental Association and the Western District Dental Society. He has been published in the Journal …
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Avoid Burnout as a Dental Assistant

Avoid Burnout as a Dental Assistant

Burnout Dental Assistant

Having a career as a Dental Assistant can be very rewarding. It can also be stressful and overwhelming at times. Working with people can get the best of us from time to time. Being a Dental Assistant requires ongoing dedication and energy. If you find yourself becoming physically and emotionally drained due to your work responsibilities as a Dental Assistant, you may be on your way to experiencing a burnout.

 

Often, stress and burnout are confused. Stress is also the result of the work environment. However, it is the result of periodic issues and complications in the work place. It might be having a bad day now and then. Burnout is a constant, ongoing feeling of not being adequate in your job on a daily basis. You may not longer take pride or interest in your position as a Dental Assistant.

 

Burnout results in feelings of hopelessness and resentment. If left untreated, it can escalate to depression. Dental Assistants who experience burnout often feel unappreciated, overworked, feel they have too much to accomplish in limited time, and begin to resent their level of responsibility. Placing unrealistic expectations on yourself is also a factor in burnout.

 

Burnout generally runs in stages. You go from feeling excited about your job as a Dental Assistant to forcing yourself to go to work each morning. Most people aren’t even sure what is wrong at this point. However, you will begin to experience exhaustion that leads to irritability. Burnout often has symptoms including headaches, changes in appetite, and high blood pressure. During phases of burnout, your relationships both outside of work and at work are going to suffer.

 

If you feel you may be suffering from burnout, talk with your supervisor. You can find support in your co-workers. You might consider attending a few counseling sessions to help you develop an action plan.

 

To avoid and eliminate burnout in the Dental Assistant field, you must meet your physical and emotional needs. Too often we spread ourselves too thin. We focus on the needs of out patients, our employer, and our family. While this is great, it is important to remember your own needs. Eventually not taking care of them will result in your inability to care for the needs of anyone else.

 

Meet your physical needs by having regular checkups, getting enough sleep, and eating right. Exercise is a very important part of feeling good physically. To keep yourself feeling good mentally, use your coping skills. Know what triggers your negative feelings and keep them in check. Keep realistic goals and demands on your body and your time. Don’t beat yourself up if you didn’t accomplish everything you set out to do that day. Instead, focus on what you did accomplish. Learn to manage your time. It is OK to say know if you already feel over extended.

 

Focusing on your social needs is also important. Nurture your relationships with your spouse, children, and close friends. Stay involved in Church and community organizations that are of interest to you. If you are unhappy with your job as a Dental Assistant, talk to your employer about help to remedy the situation. Improving your communication skills with others will also improve your over all health.

 

Dental Assistants generally enjoy their career choice and put forth their best effort everyday. However, burnout is very common in the dental field. Knowing what causes burnout, they signs and symptoms, and effective ways to manage it will make you be able to focus on your job again. Improving your physical, mental, and social health will soon having you going to work with enthusiasm and a thirst for knowledge in the dental field soon. If your feelings don’t change, you will want to discuss the situation further. It may be depression that needs to be treated instead of burnout. Realistically, some Dental Assistants realize at this time they need a career change.

How can I get a job in a dentists’ office?

Question by Simple: How can I get a job in a dentists’ office?
I am going to school to become a dentist and I am a sophomore in college. I work at a grocery store but I would rather get my foot in the door and get some dental experience. I have met people who became dental assistants without even going to college, they got to work with people doing little things like telling them to spit in a cup and all that. How hard is it to start working at one of these offices? BTW, I don’t want to be a receptionist, I want to be in the actual environment. What should I say to the owners of these clinics and how should I present myself?
Tique, dental assistants do more work than what I was describing. I don’t expect to be an actual dental assistant without a full education or experience. The people I met without an education got to clean up around the area and do some small work with the patients, they were not actual dental assistants and that is what I am interested in until I finish college. Your answer doesn’t help me at all, but thanks.
emmalue, I wasn’t knocking the receptionist position. I just don’t have an appropriate speaking voice for a job like that. I am very business-minded and am always dressed professionally but I really like the idea that you hired a woman on impulse. I guess that shows me that I have a chance. Thank you.

Best answer:

Answer by Cherie♥♫
Visit Craigslist.com or Backpage.com

What do you think? Answer below!

Why are so many reputable toothpastes not approved by the American Dental Association?

Question by Gina: Why are so many reputable toothpastes not approved by the American Dental Association?
I remember a time when you just didn’t use a toothpaste if it didn’t bear the ADA seal. But now you have to hunt to find it in the toothpaste aisle, and it generally only appears on the plane jane toothpastes. My dentist even gave me a sample recently that wasn’t ADA approved. What’s the deal?

Best answer:

Answer by iamgbot
I would assume that it has something to do with costs and time.

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