Oral piercings and infections?

Question by Bandit: Oral piercings and infections?
I have heard that oral piercings get infected easier than normal because your moth is dirty, but I have also seen that they don’t get infected easily because your mouth is constantly producing new saliva.

So which is it??

Also, are tongue WEB piercings safe?

Best answer:

Answer by dentalhyg
If you think about it, the body is going to view the piercing as something foreign- or something that shouldn’t be there. First of all, oral piercings can damage periodontal tissue. Constant contact between the jewelery and gums and tooth structure can cause recession, chipping of the teeth, nerve damage and constant inflammation. The mouth itself is not “dirty” but it home to millions of tiny micro organisms that do have the potential to cause infection. Just because our salivary glands are producing saliva, this does not mean pathogenic micro organisms may/ may not be present.

An infection can become life threatening if it’s not treated promptly, which is why if you do opt for an oral piercing you should maintan proper recare visits to the dentists office.

According to the American Dental Association, “oral piercing carries a potential risk of endocarditis, an inflammation of the heart valves or tissues. Bacteria can enter the bloodstream through the piercing site in the mouth and travel to the heart, where it can colonize on heart abnormalities. This is a risk for people with heart conditions and, in the worst of cases, results in death.”

Add your own answer in the comments!

Oral piercings and infections?

Question by Bandit: Oral piercings and infections?
I have heard that oral piercings get infected easier than normal because your moth is dirty, but I have also seen that they don’t get infected easily because your mouth is constantly producing new saliva.

So which is it??

Also, are tongue WEB piercings safe?

Best answer:

Answer by dentalhyg
If you think about it, the body is going to view the piercing as something foreign- or something that shouldn’t be there. First of all, oral piercings can damage periodontal tissue. Constant contact between the jewelery and gums and tooth structure can cause recession, chipping of the teeth, nerve damage and constant inflammation. The mouth itself is not “dirty” but it home to millions of tiny micro organisms that do have the potential to cause infection. Just because our salivary glands are producing saliva, this does not mean pathogenic micro organisms may/ may not be present.

An infection can become life threatening if it’s not treated promptly, which is why if you do opt for an oral piercing you should maintan proper recare visits to the dentists office.

According to the American Dental Association, “oral piercing carries a potential risk of endocarditis, an inflammation of the heart valves or tissues. Bacteria can enter the bloodstream through the piercing site in the mouth and travel to the heart, where it can colonize on heart abnormalities. This is a risk for people with heart conditions and, in the worst of cases, results in death.”

Add your own answer in the comments!

A Guide To Dental Health

People begin to learn about dental health from a very young age, when teeth first begin to show up. But in spite of such early awareness, many people fail to maintain good dental health through their adult life. Good dental health comprises brushing and flossing your teeth every day, and regular visits to a dentist or dental hygienist as well. Besides, people supplement their dental care with the use of products like mouthwash or advanced mouth care systems. You should keep it in mind that the lack of adequate dental care practices will result in cavities and gum disease.

It is generally advised that you use a toothbrush with softer bristles so as to protect your gums. Some people, however, prefer power brush systems that help break up plaque and bacteria in your mouth. But it takes more than brushing to keep your teeth in good health. Some other steps need to be taken to ensure that people do not lose their teeth as they become old.

To begin with, you should understand your own oral health needs, as your oral health depends on your diet, the type and amount of saliva in your mouth, your overall health and your oral hygiene routine. Try to follow a daily routine in consultation with your dentist.

As fluoride strengthens developing teeth in kids and prevents decay in adults, toothpastes and mouthwashes containing fluoride should be used. You should brush at least twice a day, if possible three times or after every meal. You should also floss at least twice a day. Brushing and flossing will remove plaque, a complex mass of bacteria that constantly forms on your teeth.

Limit the consumption of snacks and follow a balanced diet plan. Tobacco in any form will enhance the risk of oral cancer and cause stains on your teeth. Visit your dentist regularly and get your mouth examined.