Bone Graft

by Dr.O. Karnakova

Bone grafting is recommended for patients having third molar or wisdom teeth extractions due to the many benefits and restoration of the extraction site. Generally, bone grafting is recommended for patients over the age of twenty, but is often recommended for younger patients on a case-by-case scenario. Please consult with your oral surgeon if bone grafting may be needed.

Your doctor will usually recommended bone graft after third molar extractions to restore the bone level to its previous form. After the tooth is extracted, synthetic or cadaver bone is packed into the socket and allowed to integrate by osteoconduction. The bone graft will provide support distal to the second molar as well as help prevent any periodontal pockets or bone loss. In some cases, resorption of the alveolar bone or collapsing of the surrounding gum tissue may be a consequence of not placing bone graft, and can lead to drifting or misalignment of the dentition.

Extractions of Wisdom Teeth

By Dr. Sepi Fatahi

Wisdom teeth may not need to be removed if they are:

  • Healthy
  • Grown in completely (fully erupted)
  • Positioned correctly and biting properly with their opposite teeth
  • Able to be cleaned as part of daily hygiene practice
  • Many times, however, wisdom teeth — the third molars in the very back of your mouth — don’t have room to grow properly and can cause problems. Erupting wisdom teeth can grow at various angles in the jaw, sometimes even horizontally.

Sometimes wisdom teeth only partially emerge through the gums. Other times, they remain completely hidden. Wisdom teeth that aren’t able to emerge normally become impacted, or trapped, within your jaw.

If the wisdom teeth emerge partially through the gums, a passageway is created, which can cause problems. And because this area is hard to see and clean, it can become a magnet for bacteria that cause gum disease and oral infection.

Some dentists recommend removing wisdom teeth if they don’t fully emerge or if they grow near the nerve of the lower jaw. Many dentists believe it’s better to remove wisdom teeth before the roots are fully formed, when someone is younger and more likely to recover faster from surgery. This is why some young adults have their wisdom teeth pulled before the teeth cause problems and become more firmly rooted in the jaw.

According to the American Dental Association, wisdom teeth removal may be necessary if you experience changes in the area of those teeth, such as:

  • Pain
  • Repeated infection of soft tissue behind the lower last tooth
  • Cysts (fluid-filled sacs)
  • Tumors
  • Damage to nearby teeth
  • Gum disease
  • Extensive tooth decay

The decision to remove wisdom teeth isn’t always clear. Talk to your dentist or an oral surgeon about the position and health of your wisdom teeth and what’s best for your situation.

WISDOM TEETH

by American Dental Association

With age comes wisdom. Specifically, wisdom teeth.

Your mouth goes through many changes in your lifetime. One major dental milestone that usually takes place between the ages of 17 and 21 is the appearance of your third molars. Historically, these teeth have been called wisdom teeth because they come through at a more mature age.

When they come through correctly, healthy wisdom teeth can help you chew. It’s normal to feel a little discomfort when your wisdom teeth appear, but if you have pain, see your dentist immediately.

Room to Grow?

Wisdom teeth can lead to problems if there isn’t enough space for them to surface or they come through in the wrong position. If your dentist says your wisdom teeth are impacted, he or she means they are trapped in your jaw or under your gums.

As your wisdom teeth make their way through your gums, your dentist will be monitoring your mouth for signs of the following:

  • Wisdom teeth that aren’t in the right position can allow food to become trapped. That gives cavity-causing bacteria a place to grow.
  • Wisdom teeth that haven’t come in properly, which can make it difficult to floss between the wisdom teeth and the molars next to them.
  • Wisdom teeth that have partially come through can give bacteria a place to enter the gums and create a place for infection to occur. This may also lead to pain, swelling and stiffness in your jaw.
  • Wisdom teeth that don’t have room to come through are thought by some to crowd or damage neighboring teeth.
  • A wisdom tooth that is impacted can form a cyst on or near the impacted tooth. This could damage the roots of nearby teeth or destroy the bone that supports your teeth.

Why You Might Need to Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Every patient is unique, but in general, wisdom teeth may need to be removed when there is evidence of changes in the mouth such as:

  • Pain
  • Infection
  • Cysts
  • Tumors
  • Damage to neighboring teeth
  • Gum disease
  • Tooth decay (if it is not possible or desirable to restore the tooth)

Your dentist may also recommend removal of wisdom teeth as part of treatment for braces or other dental care.

Before making any decisions, your dentist will examine your mouth and take an x-ray. Together, you and your dentist can discuss the best course of treatment.

Keeping Your Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth that are not removed should continue to be monitored because the potential for developing problems later on still exists. As people age, they are at greater risk for health problems—and that includes potential problems with their wisdom teeth. Be sure to, floss around your wisdom teeth and visit your dentist regularly. Regular dental visits allow your dentist to evaluate your wisdom teeth and your overall dental health.