The Teeth

by Dr. Sepi Fatahi DMD

The teeth of a denture are typically made from various types of resin or porcelain. The latter was traditionally the preferred material because it was stronger and more durable. Porcelain is still used in some instances and has a number of advantages:

  • A glass-like ceramic material, porcelain has the same translucent appearance as natural tooth enamel, and can be color-matched closely with other teeth in the patient’s mouth.
  • Porcelain teeth feel similar to natural teeth. This makes them easier to adapt to than other materials.
  • The heating process used to make them causes the dentures to become considerably harder, which means they last longer.

The main disadvantages of porcelain dentures, however, are that they’re breakable if dropped on a hard floor and they can wear down natural teeth if they bite against them. Porcelain is better used in full dentures than in partials for this reason.

More recently, however, acrylic resin has become the go-to material for denture teeth, according to a study published by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), whose research aimed to derive a new technique of making durable dentures using injections of a hybrid composite of resin. Acrylic adheres more securely to the denture base, and is easier to adjust to achieve the correct occlusion than harder porcelain teeth. It’s also significantly less expensive than porcelain, and much lighter in weight.

The disadvantage of teeth made from acrylic resin is that they wear faster than porcelain teeth, which causes changes in the way the teeth make contact with one another. Dentures made from acrylic resin teeth may need to be replaced every five to eight years as a result, but they are still far stronger than the plastic items used in the past.

 

Effects of taking medications

Effects of taking medications for different diseases that cause xerostomia
By Dr. H. Kopel
We all need saliva to moisten and cleanse our mouths and digest food. Saliva also prevents infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth. If saliva flow is reduced or non existent then a condition called xerostomia results. Xerostomia or dry mouth may be caused by medications.

Dry mouth is a common side effect of many prescription and nonprescription drugs, including drugs used to treat depression, anxiety, pain, allergies, colds (antihistamines and decongestants), obesity, acne, epilepsy, hypertension (diuretics), diarrhea, nausea, psychotic disorders, urinary incontinence, asthma. Xerostomia can also result from certain muscle relaxants and sedatives.

When prescription medications are suspected of causing dry mouth symptoms the patient should return to their medical doctor for substitute medications or adjustment of dosage to current medication.

Here is a list of the top 15 prescribed drugs that are associated with xerostomia:
1. Hydrocodone and Acetaminaphen, narcotic
2. Lisinopril (Prinivil /Zestril), antihypertensive
3. Simvastin (Zocor), antiperlipidemic
4. Amlodipine (Norvasc), antihypertensive
5. Alprazolam (Xanax), anti-anxiety
6. Hydrochlorothiazide, diuretic
7. Omeprazole (Prilosec), anti-ulcer agent
8. Lipitor, antihyperlipidemic
9. Furosemide (Lasix), diuretic
10. Metoprolol (Lopressor), antihypertensive
11. Sertaline (Zoloft), antidepressant
12. Metoprolol (Toprol), antihypertensive
13. Zolpidem (Ambien), seadtive/hypnotic
14. Oxycodone and Acetaminophen, narcotic
15. Citalopram (Celexa), antidepressant

ILLEGAL DRUGS

by Sepi Fatahi DMD
The regular use of illegal drugs can also cause significant tooth damage. Drugs that pose a significant risk to your oral health are:
* Cannabis – This can cause dry mouth and can lead to an increased risk of gum problems. The smoke can cause oral cancer.
* Cocaine – Users sometimes rub cocaine over their gums which causes ulceration of gums and the underlying bone. When cocaine mixes with saliva it creates an acidic solution which erodes tooth enamel. Cocaine and crack cocaine cause dry mouth, which further increases the risk of tooth decay. Often users will grind their teeth (bruxism) which causes the teeth to wear down.
* Ecstasy – Side effects of the drug include bruxism (tooth grinding), jaw clenching and dry mouth.
* Heroin – Often users can crave sweet foods, which can increase the risk of tooth decay if dental hygiene is neglected. Heroin can also cause dry mouth and bruxism (tooth grinding).
* Methamphetamine – This drug causes severe and rapid tooth decay. Dental professionals have coined the term ‘meth mouth’ to describe the extensive damage typically caused by this drug. Methamphetamine is highly acidic and attacks tooth enamel. Other side effects include dry mouth, bruxism and jaw clenching.
READ MORE>>
http://www.dentalhealthweek.com.au/Adults/Lifestyle-Risks/drugs.html