Information About Root Canals


dscds

Information About Root Canals

A root canal is a dental procedure that all of us are familiar with.  Root canals are something we all dread, although when someone else is getting the procedure most of us find it to be somewhat amusing.  When someone asks for a root canal on the other hand, most of us, including dentists, find it to be very absurd to say the least.
 

Although many aren’t aware of this, root canals have been around for many generations.  Many years ago, ancient civilizations used this method to save teeth that would have been lost otherwise.  These civilizations offered root canals to those such as queens, kings, pharaohs, and the rich.  The teeth from peasants were normally extracted then sold to aristocrats.
 

Many years ago, doctors believed that worms were the reason for tooth decay.  They also believed that there were many ways to kill the worms, including rinsing the mouth in one’s own urine both day and night.  Although this is sick to say the least, this remedy was discarded in 1728, proven to be non effective and replaced by other more suitable treatment.  As time passed, doctors proved that the best way to stop the pain was to clean and remove the nerve and pulp of the tooth.
 

Root canals are a very common procedure these days, as they help to save the tooth by removing the dead or dying pulp.  The pulp exists inside of the tooth, and can spread to abscess if it isn’t taken care of.  The tissue in the pulp is kept alive by the blood vessels that come from the tip of the root and travel along the root canal into the tooth.
 

Decay is the main reason for pulp in the tooth dying.  Once the decay has reached the pulp, it will keep eating away until the pulp has died.  Once it dies, the toxins from the decay will be released into the root tip and make it’s way into the jawbone.  If not taken care of properly, the jawbone can become infected, which can lead to death in rare cases.
 

To fix this problem, the dentist will need to perform a root canal.  During the procedure, he will numb the area then drill a hole into the tooth.  Using various tools and equipment, he will go down inside of the tooth and scrape away the nerves and dead pulp.  This is a very effective procedure, although very time consuming as well. In most cases, a root canal can take several hours, although it is the only way to stop the dying pulp and save the tooth.  Even though it may take a long time – it is more than worth it when it saves your tooth from being extracted.

Crowns And Bridging


dscds

Crowns And Bridging

A root canal is a dental procedure that all of us are familiar with. Root canals are something we all dread, although when someone else is getting the procedure most of us find it to be somewhat amusing.  When someone asks for a root canal on the other hand, most of us, including dentists, find it to be very absurd to say the least.
 

Although many aren’t aware of this, root canals have been around for many generations.  Many years ago, ancient civilizations used this method to save teeth that would have been lost otherwise.  These civilizations offered root canals to those such as queens, kings, pharaohs, and the rich.  The teeth from peasants were normally extracted then sold to aristocrats.
 

Many years ago, doctors believed that worms were the reason for tooth decay.  They also believed that there were many ways to kill the worms, including rinsing the mouth in one’s own urine both day and night.  Although this is sick to say the least, this remedy was discarded in 1728, proven to be non effective and replaced by other more suitable treatment.  As time passed, doctors proved that the best way to stop the pain was to clean and remove the nerve and pulp of the tooth.
 

Root canals are a very common procedure these days, as they help to save the tooth by removing the dead or dying pulp.  The pulp exists inside of the tooth, and can spread to abscess if it isn’t taken care of.  The tissue in the pulp is kept alive by the blood vessels that come from the tip of the root and travel along the root canal into the tooth.
 

Decay is the main reason for pulp in the tooth dying.  Once the decay has reached the pulp, it will keep eating away until the pulp has died.  Once it dies, the toxins from the decay will be released into the root tip and make it’s way into the jawbone.  If not taken care of properly, the jawbone can become infected, which can lead to death in rare cases.
 

To fix this problem, the dentist will need to perform a root canal.  During the procedure, he will numb the area then drill a hole into the tooth.  Using various tools and equipment, he will go down inside of the tooth and scrape away the nerves and dead pulp. 
 

This is a very effective procedure, although very time consuming as well. In most cases, a root canal can take several hours, although it is the only way to stop the dying pulp and save the tooth.  Even though it may take a long time – it is more than worth it when it saves your tooth from being extracted.

Q&A: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?

Question by : Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?
It’s a 10 week program. The tuition is $ 3,500 due up front. I’m thinking about signing up for their application for their credit card so I can make monthly payments, but I doubt I’ll get approved. I have my bachelors degree in speech pathology but I only applied to one school for the masters program and I did not get in. I applied to dental assistant jobs that say they will train the right person, but unfortunately, I received no calls. I’m just trying to find a decent paying job so I can move out of my parents house and live on my own. Anyway, they say DA’s make 29-37,000 in Michigan. I have to pay back the money they loan me on their credit card in 18 months at 14.9% interest. I’m not good with numbers and calculations, but should I just apply anyway?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that their website doesn’t mention anything about being accredited in any way (not even nationally accredited which is basically worthless 🙂 In addition, the school is NOT accredited by the “American dental association”.

Please also instead consider the more affordable (and usually more reputable) *community college* and/or the *state-public university* (or even the county vo-tech adult school) as long as the program is accredited within the industry. Just an fyi that “American public university” is a for-profit school.

For U.S. colleges (though please still forgo those for-profit schools): http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Before considering dental assistant training, please look through some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers a dental assistant/dental hygiene program or a local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which can be difficult for some to handle.

To search for an accredited dental assistant program: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

With regard to moving out, you may be aware, but saving up one’s money is crucial before having enough to get one’s own place 🙂 How about working out a budget of your monthly expenses vs. how much money you have to work with, at this point.

Give your answer to this question below!

Dealing With Infections


dscds

Dealing With Infections

Once a tooth has been extracted, bacteria will still be alive in the mouth, even more so with those who have bad oral hygiene.  Infections are very common following extractions.  Depending on how bad the tooth was that the dentist removed, he may prescribe you some antibiotics to take that will greatly reduce your risk of getting an infection.  In some cases though, even antibiotics can’t prevent an infection.
 

If you go to the dentist before the extraction experienced swelling of the face, swollen gums, pain in your teeth under light pressure, or bleeding around the extraction site, then you may already have an infection.  If you indeed have an infection before you get the tooth treated, the dentist will prescribe you antibiotics to use following treatment.  If you have a really bad abscess, you’ll need to use antibiotics to treat the infection before the dentist will remove the tooth.
 

In some cases, people develop an infection after the extraction, even though they may not have been infected beforehand.  The reason for this, is bacteria.  Following an extraction, bacteria will be more alive in the mouth than ever before.  With the extraction site being exposed, the bacteria will be able to get into the site.  This can lead to an infection due to the site being exposed and the fact that you are unable to use mouthwash or brush during the first 24 – 48 hours.  Not being able to sterilize your mouth means that you are unable to kills the germs responsible for bacteria.
 

After extractions, the first sign of infection is renewed bleeding.  This normally occurs around 48 hours after the extraction.  Even though it normally isn’t severe, you should still call your dentist and make an appointment to be seen.  Your dentist will be able to stop the bleeding and give you some antibiotics and other prescriptions that will fix the problem.
 

Some dentists prefer to give patients antibiotics before they will do any type of extraction.  Although you may not have an abscess, most dentists prefer to get rid of the infection before they start doing their work.  They do this because they know the local anesthesia won’t work all that good with infections, and it may take them a lot of work and a lot of medicine to numb the area that you have the infection in.
 

In the event that the tooth has to be removed and the dentist simply cannot wait a few days, it is possible to get you numbed.  Although it will take quite a bit of medicine to numb the area, it can be done.  Sometimes, dentists will choose to use an IV sedation or laughing gas, in the event that local numbing doesn’t help.  An IV sedation will normally put you to sleep or knock you out, so that the dentist can remove the tooth that is causing you so much trouble.
 

Even though infections can cause a lot of pain and need to be dealt with immediately, you may not have to take antibiotics once the dentist has extracted the tooth.  If your mouth is clean and you don’t have a lot of germs, you can normally heal the would by taking care of it.  Rinsing your mouth out with salt water for the first few days will keep the extraction site clean.  As long as you take care of the extraction site and do what your dentist tells you, you shouldn’t have any further problems with the extraction site or the infection.

Q&A: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?

Question by Lisa: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?
It’s a 10 week program. The tuition is $ 3,500 due up front. I’m thinking about signing up for their application for their credit card so I can make monthly payments, but I doubt I’ll get approved. I have my bachelors degree in speech pathology but I only applied to one school for the masters program and I did not get in. I applied to dental assistant jobs that say they will train the right person, but unfortunately, I received no calls. I’m just trying to find a decent paying job so I can move out of my parents house and live on my own. Anyway, they say DA’s make 29-37,000 in Michigan. I have to pay back the money they loan me on their credit card in 18 months at 14.9% interest. I’m not good with numbers and calculations, but should I just apply anyway?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that their website doesn’t mention anything about being accredited in any way (not even nationally accredited which is basically worthless 🙂 In addition, the school is NOT accredited by the “American dental association”.

Please also instead consider the more affordable (and usually more reputable) *community college* and/or the *state-public university* (or even the county vo-tech adult school) as long as the program is accredited within the industry. Just an fyi that “American public university” is a for-profit school.

For U.S. colleges (though please still forgo those for-profit schools): http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Before considering dental assistant training, please look through some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers a dental assistant/dental hygiene program or a local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which can be difficult for some to handle.

To search for an accredited dental assistant program: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

With regard to moving out, you may be aware, but saving up one’s money is crucial before having enough to get one’s own place 🙂 How about working out a budget of your monthly expenses vs. how much money you have to work with, at this point.

What do you think? Answer below!