Dealing With Infections


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Dealing With Infections

Once a tooth has been extracted, bacteria will still be alive in the mouth, even more so with those who have bad oral hygiene.  Infections are very common following extractions.  Depending on how bad the tooth was that the dentist removed, he may prescribe you some antibiotics to take that will greatly reduce your risk of getting an infection.  In some cases though, even antibiotics can’t prevent an infection.
 

If you go to the dentist before the extraction experienced swelling of the face, swollen gums, pain in your teeth under light pressure, or bleeding around the extraction site, then you may already have an infection.  If you indeed have an infection before you get the tooth treated, the dentist will prescribe you antibiotics to use following treatment.  If you have a really bad abscess, you’ll need to use antibiotics to treat the infection before the dentist will remove the tooth.
 

In some cases, people develop an infection after the extraction, even though they may not have been infected beforehand.  The reason for this, is bacteria.  Following an extraction, bacteria will be more alive in the mouth than ever before.  With the extraction site being exposed, the bacteria will be able to get into the site.  This can lead to an infection due to the site being exposed and the fact that you are unable to use mouthwash or brush during the first 24 – 48 hours.  Not being able to sterilize your mouth means that you are unable to kills the germs responsible for bacteria.
 

After extractions, the first sign of infection is renewed bleeding.  This normally occurs around 48 hours after the extraction.  Even though it normally isn’t severe, you should still call your dentist and make an appointment to be seen.  Your dentist will be able to stop the bleeding and give you some antibiotics and other prescriptions that will fix the problem.
 

Some dentists prefer to give patients antibiotics before they will do any type of extraction.  Although you may not have an abscess, most dentists prefer to get rid of the infection before they start doing their work.  They do this because they know the local anesthesia won’t work all that good with infections, and it may take them a lot of work and a lot of medicine to numb the area that you have the infection in.
 

In the event that the tooth has to be removed and the dentist simply cannot wait a few days, it is possible to get you numbed.  Although it will take quite a bit of medicine to numb the area, it can be done.  Sometimes, dentists will choose to use an IV sedation or laughing gas, in the event that local numbing doesn’t help.  An IV sedation will normally put you to sleep or knock you out, so that the dentist can remove the tooth that is causing you so much trouble.
 

Even though infections can cause a lot of pain and need to be dealt with immediately, you may not have to take antibiotics once the dentist has extracted the tooth.  If your mouth is clean and you don’t have a lot of germs, you can normally heal the would by taking care of it.  Rinsing your mouth out with salt water for the first few days will keep the extraction site clean.  As long as you take care of the extraction site and do what your dentist tells you, you shouldn’t have any further problems with the extraction site or the infection.

Q&A: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?

Question by Lisa: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?
It’s a 10 week program. The tuition is $ 3,500 due up front. I’m thinking about signing up for their application for their credit card so I can make monthly payments, but I doubt I’ll get approved. I have my bachelors degree in speech pathology but I only applied to one school for the masters program and I did not get in. I applied to dental assistant jobs that say they will train the right person, but unfortunately, I received no calls. I’m just trying to find a decent paying job so I can move out of my parents house and live on my own. Anyway, they say DA’s make 29-37,000 in Michigan. I have to pay back the money they loan me on their credit card in 18 months at 14.9% interest. I’m not good with numbers and calculations, but should I just apply anyway?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that their website doesn’t mention anything about being accredited in any way (not even nationally accredited which is basically worthless 🙂 In addition, the school is NOT accredited by the “American dental association”.

Please also instead consider the more affordable (and usually more reputable) *community college* and/or the *state-public university* (or even the county vo-tech adult school) as long as the program is accredited within the industry. Just an fyi that “American public university” is a for-profit school.

For U.S. colleges (though please still forgo those for-profit schools): http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Before considering dental assistant training, please look through some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers a dental assistant/dental hygiene program or a local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which can be difficult for some to handle.

To search for an accredited dental assistant program: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

With regard to moving out, you may be aware, but saving up one’s money is crucial before having enough to get one’s own place 🙂 How about working out a budget of your monthly expenses vs. how much money you have to work with, at this point.

What do you think? Answer below!

Dental plans and Dental insurance

Dental plans and insurance

Dental plans and insurance

Dental coverage is normally not underwritten by insurance companies because the treatment and medication of dental needs are predictable and follow a time table. No individual would opt for a dental insurance plan if he were to pay more in premium than in annual dental charges, and the insurance company would lose money if they pay more in claims than the premium collected for each policy they underwrite.

 

Despite these drawbacks, some companies offer dental benefits by group discount schemes. These are also called discounted dental plans or affordable dental plans. These are a kind of “clubs” where membership costs a little money monthly or annually where the members can avail of dental services at a discounted rate. The dental service providers or dentists affiliated to these “clubs” have agreed to provide dental services at a discounted rate. The payment is made directly by the patient to the dentist, no paperwork or claims or future hassles. These “clubs” only do matchmaking between the patient and the dentist, earning money in the process. The dentist in turns gains to earn due to larger volumes of work. The patient gets the service at a discounted rate. It’s a WIN-WIN for all parties involved.

 

Dental Insurance when offered is again a complicated issue. The insurance company generally stresses upon background checks and pre-existing conditions. After this goes through you have to wait out until the coverage starts. When the treatment is actually undergone, a lot of paperwork regarding claims, %age exclusions etc. come to the fore where it becomes more of a pain to actually undergo and finish the process of reimbursement.

 

However insurance has its own benefits and plans have their own. A lot of employers also provide dental insurance whereupon the need for plans ceases for the individual. It’s for the individual to decide between the two as per their requirement, needs and current situation.