convenient dental assisting schools in Colorado springs?

Question by Shally: convenient dental assisting schools in Colorado springs?
I live in Colorado springs. Which schools are best to attend to become a dental assistant? Westwood college sounds convincing but the campus is in denver, which I don’t mind commuting up there for my education, but is there any convenient dental assisting schools here in the springs with good credentials? If so, which schools would they be?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that westwood is ONLY nationally accredited as opposed to the minimum regional accreditation. Their “student recruiters” are actually “sales reps” who get a commission for every student that signs up with the school 🙂 They’re one of those private For-profit schools. Therefore, their course credits usually do NOT transfer to other schools, even if the for-profit school is regionally accredited.

Just an fyi that the school that you’d mentioned is also *not* on the list of programs accredited by the “American dental association” (ADA), anyway.

There are a few community colleges accredited by the ADA in your state of residence. They’re usually a lot more affordable than those for-profit schools.

Here is the link to search for accredited DA programs: http://ada.org/5500.aspx

Before taking prerequisite courses for DA, please look through and peruse some dental textbooks, such as those found at the local community college library (that offers DA or dental hygiene) or the local dental/medical school library. Some dental patients may have severe dental disease which can be tough for some to handle.

What do you think? Answer below!

Q&A: affordable dental assistant/hygiene schools near san jose ca?

Question by Jazmin: affordable dental assistant/hygiene schools near san jose ca?
I live in san jose and have been looking for vocational dental schools/training. dont want any real expensive places like Heald, Carrington, Everest etc. please help!

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
You’re smart to want to avoid those private For-profit schools such as heald, Everest, devry and Carrington. If the local community college (or county vo-tech adult school for dental assistant) has an accredited program from the “American dental association”, those schools are usually more affordable and reputable.

Before taking pre-req courses for dental assisting or dental hygiene, please look through and peruse some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers DA or DH or the local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which may be tough for some to handle. If you haven’t done some job shadowing, please find out about that as well.

For accredited programs in DA or DH: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

U.S. colleges: http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Infections….Not Uncommon

Infections....Not Uncommon

Infections….Not Uncommon

Once a tooth has been extracted, bacteria will still be alive in the mouth, even more so with those who have bad oral hygiene. Infections are very common following extractions. Depending on how bad the tooth was that the dentist removed, he may prescribe you some antibiotics to take that will greatly reduce your risk of getting an infection. In some cases though, even antibiotics can’t prevent an infection.

 

If you go to the dentist before the extraction experienced swelling of the face, swollen gums, pain in your teeth under light pressure, or bleeding around the extraction site, then you may already have an infection. If you indeed have an infection before you get the tooth treated, the dentist will prescribe you antibiotics to use following treatment. If you have a really bad abscess, you’ll need to use antibiotics to treat the infection before the dentist will remove the tooth.

 

In some cases, people develop an infection after the extraction, even though they may not have been infected beforehand. The reason for this, is bacteria. Following an extraction, bacteria will be more alive in the mouth than ever before. With the extraction site being exposed, the bacteria will be able to get into the site. This can lead to an infection due to the site being exposed and the fact that you are unable to use mouthwash or brush during the first 24 – 48 hours. Not being able to sterilize your mouth means that you are unable to kills the germs responsible for bacteria.

 

After extractions, the first sign of infection is renewed bleeding. This normally occurs around 48 hours after the extraction. Even though it normally isn’t severe, you should still call your dentist and make an appointment to be seen. Your dentist will be able to stop the bleeding and give you some antibiotics and other prescriptions that will fix the problem.

 

Some dentists prefer to give patients antibiotics before they will do any type of extraction. Although you may not have an abscess, most dentists prefer to get rid of the infection before they start doing their work. They do this because they know the local anesthesia won’t work all that good with infections, and it may take them a lot of work and a lot of medicine to numb the area that you have the infection in.

 

In the event that the tooth has to be removed and the dentist simply cannot wait a few days, it is possible to get you numbed. Although it will take quite a bit of medicine to numb the area, it can be done. Sometimes, dentists will choose to use an IV sedation or laughing gas, in the event that local numbing doesn’t help. An IV sedation will normally put you to sleep or knock you out, so that the dentist can remove the tooth that is causing you so much trouble.

 

Even though infections can cause a lot of pain and need to be dealt with immediately, you may not have to take antibiotics once the dentist has extracted the tooth. If your mouth is clean and you don’t have a lot of germs, you can normally heal the would by taking care of it. Rinsing your mouth out with salt water for the first few days will keep the extraction site clean. As long as you take care of the extraction site and do what your dentist tells you, you shouldn’t have any further problems with the extraction site or the infection.

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