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Schools often crown themselves champions

Schools often crown themselves champions
In 1961, the defensive end from Toledo and his Buckeyes teammates were declared national champions by the Football Writers Association of America. Ohio State rallied from … More recently, Texas A&M bolstered its SEC resume with the addition of two …
Read more on Toledo Blade

The doctor lives – through prostate cancer
Cohen is a fellow of the American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons, is a member of the Texas, Southwest, and Houston Societies of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons, the American and Texas Dental Associations, the Greater Houston Dental Society, …
Read more on Your Houston News

Business digest: Sunday, Nov. 23
Bruyere has practiced general, cosmetic and implant restoration dentistry in Longview since 1985. His office is at 444 Forest Square, Suite G. He is a member of the American Dental Association, Texas Dental Association, East Texas Dental Society, and …
Read more on Longview News-Journal

Q&A: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?

Question by Lisa: Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?
It’s a 10 week program. The tuition is $ 3,500 due up front. I’m thinking about signing up for their application for their credit card so I can make monthly payments, but I doubt I’ll get approved. I have my bachelors degree in speech pathology but I only applied to one school for the masters program and I did not get in. I applied to dental assistant jobs that say they will train the right person, but unfortunately, I received no calls. I’m just trying to find a decent paying job so I can move out of my parents house and live on my own. Anyway, they say DA’s make 29-37,000 in Michigan. I have to pay back the money they loan me on their credit card in 18 months at 14.9% interest. I’m not good with numbers and calculations, but should I just apply anyway?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that their website doesn’t mention anything about being accredited in any way (not even nationally accredited which is basically worthless 🙂 In addition, the school is NOT accredited by the “American dental association”.

Please also instead consider the more affordable (and usually more reputable) *community college* and/or the *state-public university* (or even the county vo-tech adult school) as long as the program is accredited within the industry. Just an fyi that “American public university” is a for-profit school.

For U.S. colleges (though please still forgo those for-profit schools): http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Before considering dental assistant training, please look through some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers a dental assistant/dental hygiene program or a local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which can be difficult for some to handle.

To search for an accredited dental assistant program: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

With regard to moving out, you may be aware, but saving up one’s money is crucial before having enough to get one’s own place 🙂 How about working out a budget of your monthly expenses vs. how much money you have to work with, at this point.

What do you think? Answer below!

The Risk of Communicable Disease for a Dental Assistant

Communicable Disease for a Dental Assistant

Communicable Disease for a Dental Assistant

 

Dental Assistants need to make sure they fully understand the risk of communicable diseases. A communicable disease is one that is transmitted by saliva, blood, and other bodily fluids. Dental Assistants are at a very high risk because their hands come into contact with patient’s mouths all day long. This exposes them to saliva and often blood. While patients are asked to disclose information about communicable diseases including HIV, many choose not to. Some communicable diseases such as herpes form sores in the mouth and Dental Assistants need to be able to identify them. A Dental Assistant should assume every patient is contagious and take all precautions against infection.

 

Dental Assistants should always were gloves while working with patients. Even if they are only observing the procedure. This is because you never know what a normal procedure will turn into a crisis. The Dental Assistant will have to be able to jump in and assist at a moments notice. There is no time to stop to put on gloves, and it is not accepted in the dental field to perform any type of procedure without them.

 

If you feel that you have poked a hole in a glove, immediately throw it away and replace it. Do not take any chances. Communicable diseases can make you ill as the least or result in death at the other extreme. Since open sores are the most common way for communicable diseases to enter your body, make sure any such sore is completely covered with a bandage, band aid, or other covering that won’t come off with your gloves. Keep the sores covered until they have healed completely.

 

Another valuable way to prevent communicable diseases is to follow all safety procedures as outlined by the employer. If you are unclear, ask. Never take shortcuts, especially in the areas of sterilizing tools and the proper use of tools. This can lead to serious repercussions if other patients become infected with communicable diseases from dirty tools.

 

If you find that you have come into direct contact with saliva, blood, or other bodily fluids that could potentially lead to a communicable disease, wash the area immediately with soap and water. Many communicable diseases including the flu and the common cold can’t survive soap and water. You will also need to report the incident to your direct supervisor.

 

All dental facilities have policies and procedures in place for dealing with contact of saliva, blood, or other bodily fluids. It is important that you completely understand these policies and procedures from the first day of employment. Make sure you follow them completely if you do experience such contact. Most dental facilities will have the procedures written and in an easily accessible location for quick reference.

 

Working as a Dental Assistant is a fun and rewarding career choice. You will have the opportunity to work with many people and to learn more about the dental field. You will be required to perform a variety of duties as well as sit in on several types of dental procedures. It is important to remember that your safety is very important. Make sure you are aware of the risk of communicable diseases and follow all procedures for prevention as well as reporting if such contact does take place during your employment as a Dental Assistant.

Are dental implants “nice to have” when you have lost back teeth, or “need to have”?

Question by John S.: Are dental implants “nice to have” when you have lost back teeth, or “need to have”?
Patient is 80 years old with no front teeth missing. They are, however, missing 2 upper left molars, 3 upper right molars, and 2 lower right molars. They are not in pain and can chew adequately. But now a dentist specializing in cosmetic and implant dentistry has recommended expensive partial dentures to replace the missing upper 5 molars. In that the patient has no dental insurance and is fixed income, the dentist suggests spreading the cost out over time by replacing the missing upper molars with partial dentures now, and the lower molars with partial dentures in 1 year.

The question really becomes is whether the patient really needs to go broke paying for implants they may not really need. So do cosmetic and implant dentists sometimes recommend discretionary work? Or would these implants truly be necessary to prevent drifting of the remaining teeth or other deterioration?

Are implants more cosmetic? Or structurally necessary? And versus spending hundreds more on X-rays with another dentist, what is an inexpensive way to get a second opinion in a small town with few dentists?

Best answer:

Answer by Sage
In all honesty, if the patient is that old and it’s just the back teeth, why bother getting them? The patient is not in pain, and does not have any problem chewing so their is no problem. Obviously, the dentist will recommend them, because they want your money. I would suggest not to get them, if you certainly don’t need them of course. Good Luck!

Anyone answer mine?:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090728183642AA8upHh&r=w

What do you think? Answer below!

The Demand for Dental Assistants

Demand for Dental Assistants

Demand for Dental Assistants

Dental Assistants are essential to the field of dentistry. They work hard to make sure all the dental tools are cleaned properly, patients feel comfortable, and they assist Dentists and Hygienists with dental procedures. In addition, they help with lab work and are trained in medical emergency procedures. Combined, these duties require individuals who are energized and ready to help others. Dental assistants much be effective communicators and fast learners.

 

The demand for dental assistants continues to grow. Many people are taking more of an interest in their oral hygiene now than ever before. Since people are living longer, their teeth are requiring more preventative care as well as dental procedures. Dental technology has also made procedures less painful. As a result more people are willing to go in for dental services. Another area is the market for cosmetic dentistry. People are going to dental facilities to get their teeth whitened and to improve the shape of their teeth.

 

There are over 280,000 Dental Assistants currently employed Nationwide. Most of these Dental Assistants are working in dental offices. A small portion work in government agencies, prisons facilities, and physician offices. Many Dental Assistants are working in more than one dental office due to the demand for more Dental Assistants. The potential for this occupation is better than most other medical fields. It is anticipated that it will be one of the top contenders in growth through 2012.

 

There are many job opportunities for Dental Assistants in the market already. This means almost all Dental Assistants who complete a training program will secure employment immediately. This job market is Nationwide, so relocation for employment is a great possibility for those who are interested. In some instances, the employer will assist you with relocation costs.

 

Many individuals choose to enter the field of Dental Assistant because of the job market outlook and the rate of pay. On average, Dental Assistants earn $13.62 per hour as a new employee without any job experience. The highest noted starting rate Nationwide is in New York at $19.97 per hour. Considering the minimum wage in most states, the starting pay for Dental Assistants is at least double. That is a great incentive to pursue a career as a Dental Assistant.

 

Pursuing a career as a Dental Assistant can be a perfect career move. It will provide you with the opportunity to work with people, allow you to explore the dental profession, you will have not trouble securing employment, and the pay is great. You will also have standard working hours with paid Holidays. Most dental assistants receive discounted or free dental care for themselves and their families. Keeping all this in perspective, the demand for Dental Assistants is a great motivation to take a look into the career options.

 

To find out more about Dental Assistant programs in your area, contact you State Dental Board or your local colleges. You can also find great information on such programs via the internet. It is very important that you make sure any program you are considering is accredited in your state. Most programs can be completed in 12 to 24 months. Tuition assistance and scholarship programs are available. Most Human Services programs will assist with the cost of programs that can be completed within 2 years and that there is a job market for.

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