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Professionals help victim of brutal work by unlicensed Little Havana dentist

Professionals help victim of brutal work by unlicensed Little Havana dentist
… Research Clinic, is one of three programs that train foreign dental professionals in South Florida. These unique, two-year programs tend to have small classes and are accredited by the American Dental Association’s Commission on Dental Accreditation.
Read more on MiamiHerald.com (registration)

What dental professionals need to know about dental sleep medicine
Dr. Demko: The American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine is the only nonprofit national professional society dedicated exclusively to the practice of dental sleep medicine, with more than 2,800 dental professionals worldwide. The AADSM provides …
Read more on Dentistry IQ

Lack of Posterior Dentition

It is not uncommon for people to have concerns about the health of their anterior teeth due to concerns of esthetics and a beautiful smile. Equally as important are posterior teeth, which play an important role in chewing, grinding, and crushing food. Anterior teeth are designed for biting and tearing, and are unable to handle the stress of chewing.

The lack of posterior teeth may have many negative consequences on the oral health of an individual. Posterior teeth support the vertical height of the face, and may lead to a posterior bite collapse if missing. The missing of posterior teeth can also lead to the drifting, flaring, or extrusion of remaining dentition. Speech impairment and temporal mandibular disorders can also be a consequence. In addition, unnecessary stress is placed on the remaining dentition, and can lead to fractures or breakage.

Ideally, the best treatment for replacing missing posterior teeth is an implant, which have the greatest long-term prognosis. Bridges or partial dentures may also be used to restore missing teeth. Each method of replacing missing dentition is based on a patient-by-patient case. Please consult with your dentist for available treatment options best suited for your needs.

by Dr. O. Karnakova, DDS

Malocclusion

A malocclusion is a misalignment or incorrect relation between the teeth of the two dental arches when they approach each other as the jaws close. Edward Angle, who is considered the father of modern orthodontics, was the first to classify malocclusion. He based his classifications on the relative position of the permanent MAXILLARY FIRST MOLAR. Angle believed that the anteroposterior dental base relationship could be assessed reliably from first permanent molar relationship, as its position remained constant following eruption. In case where the first molars were missing, CANINE relationship is used.

CLASSIFICATION OF MALOCCLUSION

NORMAL OCCLUSION
Molar Relationship: According to Angle, the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar aligns with the buccal groove of the mandibular first molar.

Canine Relationship: The maxillary canine occludes with the distal half of the mandibular canine and the mesial half of the mandibular first premolar.

Line of Occlusion: The teeth all fit on a line of occlusion which, in the upper arch, is a smooth curve through the central fossae of the posterior teeth and cingulum of the canines and incisors, and in the lower arch, is a smooth curve through the buccal cusps of the posterior teeth and incisal edges of the anterior teeth. There is alignment of the teeth, normal overbite and overjet and coincident maxillary and mandibular midlines.

ANGLE Class I: NEUTROOCCLUSION
Molar Relationship:
 The mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first permanent molar occludes with the mesiobuccal groove of the mandibular first permanent molar.

Canine Relationship:
- The mesial incline of the maxillary canine occludes with the distal incline of the mandibular canine. The distal incline of the maxillary canine occludes with the mesial incline of the mandibular first premolar
.

Line of Occlusion: ALTERED in the maxillary and mandibular arches
.
– Individual tooth irregularities (crowding/spacing/other localized tooth problems).

– Inter-arch problems (open bite/deep bite/cross bite)
.

Mesognathic: normal, straight face profile with flat facial appearance.

ANGLE Class II: DISTOOCCLUSION (overjet)
Molar relationship: The molar relationship shows the mesiobuccal groove of the mandibular first molar is DISTALLY (posteriorly) positioned when in occlusion with the mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first molar. Usually the mesiobuccal cusp of maxillary first molar rests in between the first mandibular molar and second premolar.

Canine Relationship:
 The mesial incline of the maxillary canine occludes ANTERIORLY with the distal incline of the mandibular canine. 
The distal surface of the mandibular canine is POSTERIOR to the mesial surface of the maxillary canine by at least the width of a premolar.

Line of occlusion is not specified but irregular, depending on facial pattern, overcrowded teeth and space needs.

Retrognatic: convex face profile resulting from a mandible that is too small or maxilla that is too large.

Class II Malocclusion has 2 subtypes to describe the position of anterior teeth:

  • Class II Division 1: The molar relationships are like that of Class II and the maxillary anterior teeth are protruded. Teeth are proclaimed and a large overjet is present.

 

  • Class II Division 2: The molar relationships are Class II where the maxillary central incisors are retroclined. The maxillary lateral incisor teeth may be proclaimed or normally inclined. Retroclined and a deep overbite exists.

ANGLE Class III: MESIOOCCLUSION (negative overjet)

Molar relationship: The mesiobuccal cusp of the maxillary first permanent molar occludes DISTALLY (posteriorly) to the mesiobuccal groove of the mandibular first molar.

Canine Relationship: Distal surface of the mandibular canines are mesial to the mesial surface of the maxillary canines by at least the width of a premolar
. Mandibular incisors are in complete crossbite.

Line of occlusion is not specified but irregular, depending on facial pattern, overcrowded teeth and space needs.

Prognathic: concave face profile with prominent mandible is associated with Class III malocclusion.

CLASS III Malocclusion Class III malocclusion has 2 subdivisions:

  1. TRUE class III malocclusion (SKELETAL) which is genetic in origin due to excessively large mandible or smaller than normal maxilla.

 

  1. PSEUDO Class III malocclusion (FALSE or postural) which occurs when mandible shifts anteriorly during final stages of closure due to premature contact of incisors or the canines. Forward movement of the mandible during jaw closure can also result from premature loss of deciduous posterior teeth.

 

Class III Sub-division: Class III molar relationship exists on one side and the other side as a normal Class I molar relationship.

By Dr. S. Fatahi, DDS

Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?

Question by : Is the Michigan Dental Assisting School at Bright Side Dental worth it?
It’s a 10 week program. The tuition is $ 3,500 due up front. I’m thinking about signing up for their application for their credit card so I can make monthly payments, but I doubt I’ll get approved. I have my bachelors degree in speech pathology but I only applied to one school for the masters program and I did not get in. I applied to dental assistant jobs that say they will train the right person, but unfortunately, I received no calls. I’m just trying to find a decent paying job so I can move out of my parents house and live on my own. Anyway, they say DA’s make 29-37,000 in Michigan. I have to pay back the money they loan me on their credit card in 18 months at 14.9% interest. I’m not good with numbers and calculations, but should I just apply anyway?

Best answer:

Answer by jannsody
Please be aware that their website doesn’t mention anything about being accredited in any way (not even nationally accredited which is basically worthless 🙂 In addition, the school is NOT accredited by the “American dental association”.

Please also instead consider the more affordable (and usually more reputable) *community college* and/or the *state-public university* (or even the county vo-tech adult school) as long as the program is accredited within the industry. Just an fyi that “American public university” is a for-profit school.

For U.S. colleges (though please still forgo those for-profit schools): http://www.utexas.edu/world/univ

General career info: http://www.bls.gov/ooh and can search.

Before considering dental assistant training, please look through some dental textbooks such as those found at the local community college library that offers a dental assistant/dental hygiene program or a local dental/medical school library. Some patients may have severe dental disease which can be difficult for some to handle.

To search for an accredited dental assistant program: http://www.ada.org/5500.aspx

With regard to moving out, you may be aware, but saving up one’s money is crucial before having enough to get one’s own place 🙂 How about working out a budget of your monthly expenses vs. how much money you have to work with, at this point.

Give your answer to this question below!

Gum Disease Risk Factors

by AAP (American Academy of Periodontology
The main cause of periodontal (gum) disease is plaque, but other factors affect the health of your gums.

Age

Studies indicate that older people have the highest rates of periodontal disease. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that over 70% of Americans 65 and older have periodontitis.

Smoking/Tobacco Use

Tobacco use is linked with many serious illnesses such as cancer, lung disease and heart disease, as well as numerous other health problems. Tobacco users also are at increased risk for periodontal disease. Studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease.

Genetics

Research has indicated that some people may be genetically susceptible to gum disease. Despite aggressive oral care habits, these people may be more likely to develop periodontal disease. Identifying these people with a genetic test before they even show signs of the disease and getting them into early intervention treatment may help them keep their teeth for a lifetime.

Stress

Stress is linked to many serious conditions such as hypertension, cancer, and numerous other health problems. Stress also is a risk factor for periodontal disease. Research demonstrates that stress can make it more difficult for the body to fight off infection, including periodontal diseases.

Medications

Some drugs, such as oral contraceptives, anti-depressants, and certain heart medicines, can affect your oral health. Just as you notify your pharmacist and other health care providers of all medicines you are taking and any changes in your overall health, you should also inform your dental care provider.

Clenching or Grinding Your Teeth

Clenching or grinding your teeth can put excess force on the supporting tissues of the teeth and could speed up the rate at which these periodontal tissues are destroyed.

Other Systemic Diseases

Other systemic diseases that interfere with the body’s inflammatory system may worsen the condition of the gums. These include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Poor Nutrition and Obesity

A diet low in important nutrients can compromise the body’s immune system and make it harder for the body to fight off infection. Because periodontal disease begins as an infection, poor nutrition can worsen the condition of your gums. In addition, research has shown that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal disease.

https://www.perio.org/consumer/risk-factors

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